Why You Need At Least One Patterned Suit

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Driving the speed limit. Going to the doctor. Waiting for your coffee to cool down before you drink it. Doing all of these things in life will keep you safe. Safe can be great and safe can be comfortable. But, wouldn’t it be nice to step out of the safety zone for a change? Start small, and start with a new suit — a patterned suit! While patterns can send some guys running for the menswear hills, we’ll show you just how unscary (and flattering) patterns can be.

The Pinstripes: Just Getting Your Feet Wet

For those that are still wary of a pattern, a classic pinstripe suit is the best way to venture into patterns. The great thing about vertical pinstripes is the way they create a slimming a sleek look to your suit. It can be worn by someone of any height or build. One thing to be aware of is the size of the pinstripe. For a more formal look, go for a thin stripe. If you want something a little bolder, a thicker stripe will work, but try to keep it as monochromatic (think tone-on-tone) as possible to avoid the “clown on stilts” look.

Choose from navy, black, and charcoal.

The Plaids: Not Just For Hipsters Anymore

The great thing about plaid is that it is sort of a “catch-all” term meaning intersecting lines. Plaids are probably the most versatile pattern in menswear, so generally speaking, there’s a plaid for everyone. Plaids can be a great, eye-catching look that will take you from office to after-work drinks without looking too stuffy at either occasion.

When wearing plaids, it’s best to find patterns that fit your body shape. Large prints can often make you look larger if you’re not. The cut of the suit is very important to keep that sleek and sophisticated look. And when pairing your tie, a little texture (like a knit, or even a tone-on-tone Herringbone) will bring more dimension to your look, without making you look to clashy.

The Herringbones: You’ll Know it When You See It

Even if you never knew the name of this pattern, it is one of the most traditional and recognizable suit patterns out there. The Herringbone is made up of zig-zagged chevron patterns. Usually the pattern is small and understated, which makes it the ideal pattern to pair with, well, anything. Herringbone usually shines in a grey or navy palette, but more recent colors such as a dessert sand and warm brown tones make are giving this classic pattern a delightfully modern twist.

No matter the color, when you walk into a business meeting in a tailored Herringbone suit, you’re letting everyone know who the executive really is.

If you’re looking for a little flair in your next suit, come to Karako Suits where your style and quality meet.

Originally posted at www.karakosuits.com on October 5, 2017.

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Using Patterns Effectively

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While we’ve touched on patterns in your suit before, for the next two weeks we want to take a deeper look at the do’s-and-don’ts of pattern pairing, and how you can use clashing patterns to make your suit look that much more stylish. Here are a few points to keep in mind:

1. Do you have carryover between patterns?

Let’s use a simple example: You have a solid colored shirt, but a striped tie. How do you ensure these will go together? Well, a simple way is to ensure that the smaller stripe on the tie matches the color of your shirt, that way the rest of the stripes act as a “pop” of color, while the matching color in the tie pairs them both together.

However, we can go a little further with this example: You could also have a tie with complimentary stripes to the shirt. For example, if your shirt is blue, a great choice may be to have have a pink/white striped tie, as they each pop off each other well.

2. What if the shirt is patterned?

You have many options from here, but let’s start simple: If you have patterned shirt and can’t tell if you could get away with another pattern, then you should make sure to have a solid-colored tie. It’s the simplest way to avoid accidentally mis-matching patterns.

Alternatively, if you have a subtle shirt pattern a tie with a bolder pattern will play off each other nicely. The key is balance. If one aspect is bold and brash, the other can’t be as well, or you’ll wind up looking like a clown.

3. Striped vs. checkered?

So, let’s get this out of the way: Very rarely will it be okay to combine a striped and checkered piece of your outfit. Oftentimes the contrasting lines wind up looking like a mess, and coordinating an outfit with those two requires some great dress skills which take some time to acquire.

If you’re leaning on a type of pattern to try out, go with checkered. A checkered pattern can pair easily with solids to give your outfit some texture without the interesting effects stripes can sometimes have on your body.

Of course, these are just the simple tips–next week we dive into some of the bigger nuances of style. If you need a great outfit to impress, don’t forget to check out our selection at Karako Suits.

 


Originally published at www.karakosuits.com on May 21, 2017.